Uncategorized

Guest Post: Sesame Fish Cakes with Cilantro Mayo, Seasonal and Savory

It is all too easy to fall into a predictable (i.e. boring) routine with your protein – chicken thighs, ground beef, the occasional steak or pork chop – but there are so many options out there, especially in the fish and seafood category, that can quickly spice up your meal rotation!

Beyond steaming some shrimp or grilling some salmon, many folks aren’t sure where to begin with fish and seafood, or what recipes to utilize when trying to keep a grocery budget in mind. However, some bloggers out in the paleo-sphere do a great job at creating fresh new fish recipes that will excite the tastebuds, while still keeping your grocery budget in check. 

Here today to share such a creation is Angela from Seasonal and Savory. Be sure to also check out one of her many amazing recipes on her site – her posts feature all sorts of deliciousness that is sure to add some diversity back into your meal rotation. 

Take it away Angela! 

♥♥♥

Hi, this is Angela, from Seasonal and Savory! I’m delighted to be here to share one of my favorite fish recipes with you all. This is a simple recipe that can be baked or pan fried, and because of the mild flavor of the white fish and the crunchy sesame coating it is a dish that even fish-avoiders will likely enjoy. Don’t be intimidated by the list of ingredients; I promise it all comes together in minutes.

I like to serve the warm fish cakes on a cool bed of spiralized cucumber noodles that I toss with a little sesame oil and some toasted sesame seeds. Top the fish cakes with an easy sauce made with homemade mayo mixed with fresh lemon juice and chopped cilantro, and you have a wonderful summer meal that is cruncy-cool-spicy-creamy. We are swimming in fresh cilantro from our garden and have been tossing it in everything, and it goes particularly well with fish. However, if you are one of those folks who dislikes cilantro you can certainly substitute some fresh parsley in the cakes and in the mayo.

Paleo Parents Guest Post: Sesame Fish Cakes with Cilantro Mayo, Seasonal and Savory

Locating Sustainably-sourced Fish
Despite the fact that we live in Colorado, which is about as land-locked as a state can be, we adore fish and eat it at least twice a week. We are fortunate that we have several places to buy fresh and frozen seafood, including a great local fish shop, but even with those options it can be a challenge to find out which species are sustainably harvested. My go-to source for this is the Marine Conservation Society, which provides info on sustainability based on a five-point scale.

Depending on the area of sourcing and how it was caught, cod can be a sustainable fish to use in this recipe and I have used it in the past when I have found a good source. Other good choices are pollack, hake, or catfish. The delicate flavors of the seasonings work best with a mild white fish, but if you love salmon or char don’t be afraid to use them instead to whip up this recipe!

Paleo Parents Guest Post: Sesame Fish Cakes with Cilantro Mayo, Seasonal and Savory

Sesame Fish Cakes with Cilantro Mayo

Ingredients

Instructions

    For the Fish Cakes
  1. If you plan to bake the fish cakes, preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Place the fish, egg, salt, white pepper, lemon juice, sesame oil, almond flour, green onions, and cilantro in the bowl of your food processor. Pulse until the mixture is a coarse paste. You want a little texture left to the fish, so don't make this into a puree.
  3. Place the sesame seeds on a plate. Using damp hands, form the fish mixture into four patties that are about an inch thick, then press each patty into the sesame seeds, lightly coating each side.
  4. To bake the fish cakes, oil a baking sheet with coconut or avocado oil. Place the coated fish cakes in a single layer and bake them for 20 minutes, or until they are firm to the touch in the center.
  5. To pan fry the cakes, coat the bottom of a large skillet with some coconut or avocado oil and turn the heat on to medium. Cook the fish cakes 4-5 minutes per side, flipping once carefully, or until golden brown and firm to the touch in the center of the cakes.
  6. Serve the fish cakes warm, topped with some of the cilantro mayo. If you want to make the cucumber noodles, toss a couple of peeled, spiralized cucumbers with a tablespoon of toasted sesame oil, two teaspoons of toasted sesame seeds, and some fresh cilantro.
  7. For the Mayo
  8. Stir together the mayo, lemon juice, and cilantro. Chill until ready to serve.
http://realeverything.com/guest-post-sesame-fish-cakes-with-cilantro-mayo-seasonal-and-savory/
 [author] [author_image timthumb=’on’]http://paleoparents.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/64719_506097866135254_153979327_n.jpg[/author_image] [author_info]Angela lives with her husband, Harrison, in the beautiful Front Range of Colorado, where they both teach at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Angela is an award-winning home cook who started adapting her recipes to be grain-free and Paleo in 2012. She enjoys seasonal cooking with a focus on fresh produce, and she is a big advocate of growing your own food and supporting local agriculture through farmers’ markets and C.S.A. shares. She and her husband love camping, gardening, cooking, and hanging out with their cuddly pet chickens, Mabel, Gertie, Lightning, and Buffy. Connect with Angela: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest [/author_info] [/author]

You Might Also Like

  • Janet

    I just watched an episode of America’s Test Kitchen. They did a piece on sesame encrusted salmon. They had a recommendation to improve the taste and texture of the sesame seeds. They soaked the sesame seeds in a brine (made from 5 tablespoons of salt in 2 quarts of water; they used 1 cup of that for the seeds and the rest to brine the salmon fillets) for about 5 minutes, then draining them and lightly toasting the seeds in a dry non-stick pan for about 5 minutes before using them to coat the fish. It prevents the seeds from having a dull and chewy flavor/texture. Brining the sesame seeds causes the starches in the seeds to absorb water. Then when you toast them the starches gelatinize making them nice and crispy and bring out the sesame flavor.